Action and/or Adventure, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Star Trek (The Original Series)

as: Captain James T. Kirk

In reality, Tom Wopat was just fifteen years young when Star Trek debuted in 1966. But, for the purposes of this blog, we’re going to imagine he was old enough for the part of Captain Kirk, a role that was, of course, originally made famous by William Shatner (who was thirty-five when he first sat in the captain’s chair).

Too many Kirks.

Too many Kirks.

Key Changes

We’ll more or less split the age difference and imagine that Wopat was twenty-eight when he won the role of Kirk (the same age he was when The Dukes of Hazzard began in 1979). With a younger and far more strapping actor as Kirk—no offense to Shatner, but he was more than a little doughy—the writers could’ve upped the ante on the Captain’s physical altercations with alien creatures and other enemies. Gone would be the poorly choreographed, obviously pulled punches of Shatner’s action scenes, replaced with more athletic combat heroics. A Starship captain famous for his jumping spin kicks (or his spinning jump kicks) would’ve struck fear into many a Klingon heart.

Additionally, as it is widely known that Tom Wopat looks quite dashing in blue, Star Trek’s costumes would likely have been altered so that blue was the uniform color for the Command and Flight Crews, with yellow instead being for Science and Medical personnel.

Shatner, of course, played Kirk with more than a smirk of cockiness when appropriate. Chris Pine’s portrayal of the character in the recent “reboot” Star Trek films, turned this up to 11. Both actors gave the character an air of brashness, but with the smarts and skills to back it up. Tom Wopat’s take on Captain Kirk likely would’ve been a bit different—we envision Wopat-Kirk as more of a rugged, roguish, charmer; less smirk, more winning smile. Something along the lines of Indiana Jones (particularly in the opening gambit of Temple of Doom) or (whoda thunk?) Luke Duke.

Photo credit: JD Hancock via Foter.com / CC BY

Kids and/or Family, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: The Harry Potter Series

as: Severus Snape

For Harry Potter fanatics—and fans of good books in general—Severus Snape is one of the most compelling and complex characters in the stories’ universe. The late, great Alan Rickman’s portrayal of Snape is nothing short of magnificent across all eight Potter films, particularly at the conclusion of the series when the character’s motivations and backstory are completely fleshed out. There are few actors who could’ve delivered a better performance in the role than Rickman.

Tom Wopat is one of them.

Key Changes

First of all, Tom Wopat is decidedly un-British. I’ve never heard him speak with a faux-British accent, but I bet he could totally nail it, because he’s Tom Wopat. However, without Rickman’s unique voice, Snape’s lines would’ve lost some of their snarl. An accented-up Wopat surely would’ve given his readings his own flavor, but different sections of dialogue would’ve stuck in viewers heads as Snape’s “signature” lines.

slytherin

Wopat is roughly five years younger than Rickman—not much of a difference, but it does put him more closely in line with the age the character would’ve been, according to information presented in the books. When the first movie in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (renamed the Sorcerer’s Stone for us Neanderthal Americans), was released in 2001, Wopat was 50 years old. Snape was a classmate of Harry Potter’s parents, and Harry himself is 11 when the story begins. This would mean that Harry’s parents were around 39 when he was born—not exactly how things are described in the books, but 40-ish is a little easier to fudge than 45-ish.

In the film series, particularly the early entries, Harry and his fellow Hogwarts students comment on Snape’s unpleasant appearance. It’s hard to believe that, even with the magic of movie makeup, the filmmakers could’ve uglied up Tom Wopat enough for these lines to land. Instead, the lines would’ve had to be changed. One of the older female students—a friend of Fred and George Weasley, perhaps—could’ve made a comment along the lines of “Professor Snape is so awful, I can’t stand his classes…but he sure is dreamy” or whatever British teenagers say.

Photo credit: Karen Roe via Foter.com / CC BY

Classics, Kids and/or Family, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Labyrinth

as: Jareth the Goblin King

I’m sure you’re thinking this one is kind of a stretch, but hear me out…

While their careers couldn’t be more different, both Tom Wopat and the late, great David Bowie were pretty close to the top of the celebrity food chain in 1986 when Labyrinth was released. David Bowie spent most of the year David Bowie-ing, as is his wont. The Dukes of Hazzard had just ended its run on television after seven seasons, so Wopat would’ve been perfectly positioned to make a major move into film work.

labyrinth

Key Changes

For our “Tom Wopat as Jareth the Goblin King” re-imagining of Labyrinth, there are two key issues which must be addressed.

First, the music. Labyrinth is a brilliant, visually stunning movie, but the songs in it are all pretty terrible. Don’t get me wrong, Bowie gave us some genuine masterpieces, but “Magic Dance” is not one of them. (Same goes for the other four tracks the Thin White Duke wrote and recorded for the film). Wopat, being a singer as well, could’ve put a whole different spin on it. He likely would’ve created more organic, folk-inspired songs, which for my money would fit the film better. Why would a mythical creature—like Jareth—in a vaguely Medieval setting—like the labyrinth—sing weird, dancey ‘80s pop? An acoustic guitar (or a lute or whatever) seems more natural to Labyrinth’s world than a synthesizer.

Second, costuming and makeup. Bowie didn’t actually wear any costumes in the movie—he just showed up in his street clothes and they started shooting. I don’t think Wopat would’ve looked quite the same in all that spandex and bright colored makeup; the Jareth costumes would have to be a bit more… earthy, let’s say. Animal pelts/furs and rough-cut leather would be a little more in Jareth Wopat’s wheelhouse, methinks. This direction seems like it would work better with the change in music, as well. Makeup could still be used to give the character a fantastical look, but instead of reds and purples and pinks, maybe dark greens and blues—again, just a bit more organic looking.

Photo credit: 7th Street Theatre via Foter.com / CC BY

Classics, Comedy, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: The Back to the Future Trilogy

as: Biff Tannen

Wopat as the villain? Back to the Future’s Biff Tannen is one of the all-time great movie bad guys—you couldn’t say he’s a villain, exactly, just a massive jerk who has a way with the word “butthead.” And great though Thomas F. Wilson was in the role, we think Tom Wopat would’ve given it a little something extra by not only making Biff a jerk, but a good-looking jerk. (Which is the very worst kind.)

back to the future

Wopat would, of course, portray the young, middle-aged, and elderly versions of Biff through the magic of movie makeup. He would also play Griff Tannen in Back to the Future Part II and Buford “Mad Dog” Tannen in Back to the Future Part III.

Representative Scene: Café Kerfuffle & Skateboard Chase

Time-traveler Marty (Michael J. Fox) and George McFly (Crispin Glover) are at the counter at Lou’s Café, going over a plan for George to win the heart of Lorraine Baines (Lea Thompson). In walks Biff (Tom Wopat) and his gang of teenage ne’er-do-wells.

“Hey McFly,” Biff Wopat yells to George, “I thought I told you never to come in here. Well, it’s gonna cost you. How much money you got on you?”

Biff advances menacingly toward George, but Marty sticks his leg out and trips him. Biff is quickly back on his feet and now stands towering over the much, much shorter Marty.

“All right, punk,” says Tom Wopat as Biff, “now I’m gonna—”

“Whoa, Biff,” Marty says, pointing out the window over Biff’s shoulder. “What’s that?”

Biff is momentarily distracted, and Marty suckerpunches him in the face. Using the catlike reflexes he displayed in his action scenes in The Dukes of Hazzard, Wopat counters with a jab of his own, then sends Marty flying through the window with a spinning karate kick.

Marty quickly gets back to his feet, shaking shards of broken glass off his jacket. He spots a kid riding a homemade scooter down the street. Marty stops the kid, commandeers the scooter, and breaks it apart, creating a rudimentary skateboard. “I’ll get it back to you, all right?” he says as he skates out of frame.

Biff Wopat and crew emerge from the diner to chase Marty down on foot. With the help of his skateboard and a passing truck, Marty quickly outdistances them. Biff et al get in Biff’s car, a 1940s Ford convertible, inexplicably painted bright orange and with “01” stenciled on the side. (No Confederate flag on the convertible top, though—Biff may be a jerk, but he’s no bigot.)

Biff and company now give chase through the streets of Hill Valley, though Marty continues to elude them. When it appears the bad guys finally have Marty dead to rights, he escapes and sends the Ford barreling into a parked manure truck.

Instead of swerving and crashing broadside into the truck (as in the original film), Biff Wopat guns the engine. The truck’s bed is tilted upward to facilitate the unloading of manure (used as fertilizer), and Wopat uses it to ramp off of, sending his car flying through the air where it lands safely on the other side. He and his goons survive to torment Marty and George another day (of course).

Photo credit: JD Hancock via Foter.com / CC BY

 

Action and/or Adventure, Original Wopatizations, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Armageddon 2 (A—More or Less—Original Wopatization)

as: Mark Frost

First off, let me say that, despite its obvious scientific inaccuracies and the fact that it’s directed by unabashed schlockmeister Michael Bay, I absolutely love Armageddon. I can’t really explain why, but I do. Hard. Which is why I would love to see a sequel, as utterly ridiculous as it would inevitably be.

As you may recall, the hero of the original Armageddon was Harry Stamper, played by Bruce Willis with typical Bruce Willisness. You may also recall that Harry got blown to smithereens at the end of the flick, sacrificing himself to ensure the detonation of the bomb that would blow up the “planet killer” asteroid.

To replace the Harry character in Armageddon 2: Armageddon Harder you’d need an actor who can fill ably fill those empty, Bruce Willis-sized shoes. That actor is Tom Wopat.

A much simpler solution to the asteroid problem.

A much simpler solution to the asteroid problem.

Plot Synopsis

Much like the original film, Armageddon 2 is about a giant asteroid that’s on a collision course with Earth, and the heroic oil rig workers and astronauts who work together to save the day. In Armageddon, Willis played the father of Liv Tyler’s character, Grace Stamper; in Armageddon 2, the lead character, Mark Frost, is the father of Ben Affleck’s character from the first film, A.J. Frost. (We’re going to assume that all the characters who didn’t die in the first film will be returning for the sequel, as will the actors who portrayed them.)

Again, the US guvment detects an incoming asteroid—this one FOUR times the size of Texas—and comes up with a cunning plan to stop it: the same plan they used dang near 20 years ago when it happened the first time! They round up A.J. and the rest of the gang, but determine that stopping a bigger asteroid requires a bigger crew. A.J. immediately volunteers his father, Mark (played by Tom Wopat).

A.J., Grace, et al set out to track Mark/Wopat down. They find him working in the booming oil fields of North Dakota, operating a frac sand plant. He hasn’t worked on an actual oil rig in years, he explains, and so has lost his touch for the precision deep-drilling needed for the mission. A.J. eventually convinces him to join them, and they set off for NASA HQ in Houston for training.

As NASA no longer flies its own space missions, the project is a joint venture between American and Chinese space agencies, and Chinese astronauts are training with A.J., Mark, and the US team. Mark, being an old-school, true-blue-American type, is more than a little reluctant to work with, as he puts it, “those Commie SOBs.”

The training goes remarkably well for the most part, as many of the crew went through a similar process in Armageddon. The whole gang takes off into space, this time in THREE separate shuttles—the Freedom II, the Independence II and the Liberty. As in the first film, the crew is divided up into multiple teams to ensure success in case one of them crashes into the asteroid and dies horribly (or fails in another, less spectacular fashion).

After a quick pit stop at the International Space Station, which does not go down in flames like Mir did in a similar situation in the first film, all three shuttles fly out to meet the asteroid head on, having learned a valuable lesson the last time out about approaching a colossal space object from behind. Nevertheless, Freedom II is struck by flying debris and is destroyed; her entire crew dies with her.

Independence II and Liberty land safely on opposite sides of the asteroid and commence drilling, with A.J. leading the crew of the former ship and Wopat captaining the team from the latter. Both teams work to drill to the center of the asteroid, so that another ginormous nuclear bomb can be stuffed inside. A.J.’s team is doing exceptionally well at first, hitting the various depth checkpoints well before the allotted time has passed. The other group initially fares poorly, as Mark continues to butt heads with his Chinese teammates.

Before long, A.J.’s drill hits a gas pocket, and the ensuing explosion (because everything unexpected must lead to an explosion in a Michael Bay movie) leaves A.J. injured and unable to continue his task. The drill itself, a new-and-improved version of the Armadillos from the first film, is damaged but still functional; they also lose the ability to communicate with the Liberty team. One of the Chinese team members takes control of the Armadillo and continues drilling.

Meanwhile, Wopat and crew are hitting their stride. Mark, despite his ongoing disputes with his Chinese colleagues, rediscovers his deep-drilling groove and is soon closing in on the target depth. However, their slow start means that the “zero hour,” the time by which they absolutely must detonate their bomb, is rapidly approaching.

To make matters worse, miscommunication between Mark and a Chinese crewman lead to their team’s drill being incapacitated following another (larger and louder than necessary) explosion. Following a considerable verbal and physical altercation, Wopat sets out to deploy the bomb, shoving it ahead of him into the hole he’s drilled. He knows they haven’t reached their mark, but there is no other alternative.

As he reaches the bottom of the hole, Mark/Wopat realizes that he’s in the same scenario that Harry Stamper found himself in all those years ago. Knowing he will likely die, he apologizes to his Chinese teammates in the kind of manly-yet-tearjerking monologue common to action movies of this ilk.

Just when all seems lost, Independence II’s team’s drill breaks through the opposite side of Mark’s asteroid hole. The two teams combined to drill a hole all the way through the asteroid, albeit unintentionally. The Chinese crew member operating the other Armadillo makes a totally hilarious joke about the irony of him drilling all the way through and finding an American.

Wopat rides to the surface on the Armadillo’s extendable arm, but not before placing the second bomb (from the Independence II). The hole through the asteroid somehow makes communication between the two teams possible again, and after a quick explanation of what happened, everyone hastily climbs aboard their respective spaceships.

They take off and are clear of the asteroid with a full minute to spare. The bombs detonate, the asteroid is essentially vaporized, and everyone lives happily ever after. Except all the guys who blew up with the Freedom II, but none of them were main characters anyway, so who cares?

Photo credit: originalrobart via Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Action and/or Adventure, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Star Wars

as: Han Solo, of course.

If The Duke of Hazzard hadn’t started airing two years after the original Star Wars movie was released, I’d be surprised as heck that things didn’t shake out this way to begin with. If you think about it, Han Solo and Luke Duke are clearly cut from the same cloth: roguish, a little bit cocky, dark haired, good looking, and both are excellent drivers/pilots with totally kicka$$ rides. (I guarantee the General Lee could make the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs.) And Tom Wopat and Harrison Ford both had flat-out spectacular hair in the late ‘70s, too.

Han Solo

Scene: Escape from the Death Star

After busting Princess Leia out of the Detention Level, and avoiding being squashed like a bug in the garbage compactor, the fearless Han Wopat leads Leia, Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca, R2-D2, and C-3PO back to hangar bay and the awaiting Millennium Falcon.

On the way, they encounter a patrol of Imperial Storm Troopers. Wopat and Chewbacca open fire and give chase.

*Here, we’d replace Han Solo’s pistol-style blaster with one that’s more similar to Chewie’s crossbow rifle, because, y’know, the Dukes love their bows and arrows. Maybe a hybrid pistol/crossbow blaster or something like that.*

After retreating from a phalanx of Storm Troopers who had ambushed them, Han Wopat and Chewbacca soon rendezvous with Luke, Leia, and the Droids. They dash toward the Falcon, with Wopat and Luke blasting enemies left and right.

As Darth Vader approaches, the group wisely decides to make a run for it. Wopat runs, jumps, and slides across the hood of the Falcon, then dives nimbly through the open window and into the driver’s seat. Chewie soon joins him as co-pilot, followed closely by the others, all of whom used the more traditional loading ramp as their entrance.

Wopat brings the Millennium Falcon roaring to life and stomps on the gas. Leaving a cloud of smoke and patches of burned rubber in his wake, he steers the ship up a conveniently-placed but wholly unnecessary ramp. The Rebels flee into space as the orchestral score plays a variation of the intro to Dixie.

Photo credit: John Kannenberg via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

Action and/or Adventure, Kids and/or Family, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990 Version)

as: Baxter Stockman

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are, essentially, one of the most successful results of a random drunken conversation ever. Over a few adult beverages, creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird more or less challenged each other to create the weirdest, most random comic book character they could think of. The result was the Ninja Turtles, quickly amended to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to make them even weirder.

No way a sober person came up with this.

No way a sober person came up with this.

After a relatively long and somewhat successful run of black and white comics (first self-published, then picked up by Mirage Studios), the series was transmogrified into the colorful action figures and cartoon series that made the Ninja Turtles into household names. The first feature film based on the characters, released in 1990, is still arguably the best, though it played fast and loose with the comic series’ established mythology (as well as the cartoon series’ mythology, which was itself significantly modified from the comic book version).

As such, we figured another tweak or two wouldn’t hurt. What better way to tweak…well, anything, than by adding Tom Wopat?

Wopatization Is Kind of Like Mutation

Baxter Stockman was always one of our favorite secondary TMNT characters, but he unfortunately never made it into the big leagues of live-action movies. Here, we set out to both correct that egregious oversight and give Tom Wopat a place in the greatest mutant-based film franchise of all time. (Sorry, X-Men.)

In the comic books and the cartoon series, Stockman starts out as a super-intelligent scientist working for the Shredder, and eventually ends up mutating into a humanoid fly (not unlike Jeff Goldblum in The Fly). He also invented the robotic Mousers that terrorize the Ninja Turtles and their mutant rat sensei, Splinter, many, many times throughout both series. Long story short, he’s a bad guy.

However, there’s more than enough going on in the first Ninja Turtles movie without adding another mutant baddie, so we’d leave his mutation (and the Mousers) for later films. In our Wopatized version of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Stockman would be one of those minor characters that you can tell will become important later on. (For other examples of this talking picture phenomenon, see basically any movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.)

Here, Stockman would be a brilliant, but unappreciated scientist whose occupational apathy gets him fired from TGRI, the company shown in the sequel, The Secret of the Ooze, to be responsible for the mutagen that made the Turtles what they are. Stockman soon enters Shredder’s employ, instantly becoming the smartest person on the Foot Clan payroll.

However, his genius is still underutilized. Instead of actual scientific research, Stockman is put to work sciencing up the metal stampings that make up Shredder’s armor in an attempt to make the razor-sharp metal plates even more deadly. Again feeling unappreciated, and realizing that his new boss is a villain, Stockman defects and joins the Ninja Turtles to thwart the Foot’s schemes.

Why Wopat?

Tom Wopat is the perfect actor for this role for a number of reasons. Number One, he’s awesome. No more explanation necessary there, amirite?

Beyond that, we feel that Wopat could very convincingly portray a super-scientist in this sort of film. At the time the film was released, he was 39 years old, which seems about right to be a scientist who’s that advance in his career, but also straight up sick of his job. Wopat would give the character the ideal balance of comic book energy, charm, and pathos. He’d also be just the right amount of famous to play a character about whom viewers are meant to think “he’s not that important now, but I bet he will be later.”

Photo credit: W10002 via Foter.com / CC BY-SA

Action and/or Adventure, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Iron Man

as: Tony Stark/Iron Man

Iron Man was the first film in what is now known as the “Marvel Cinematic Universe.” (Previous Marvel films—like Spider-Man and the Dolph Lundgren version of The Punisher—aren’t included in said universe because they weren’t produced/released by Marvel Studios.) It set the bar pretty high, and, for my money, has yet to be surpassed by any of the increasingly-interconnected comic book movies that have been made since.

Iron Man also heralded Robert Downey, Jr.’s big comeback. (Comeback #4 or so, by my count, but this one stuck.) RDJ is undoubtedly great in the role, and I for one am glad that he’s back in the Hollywood game; he seems like a pretty good dude, and just so happens to be one heck of an actor. Because he is so darned great, it seems inevitable that he would’ve made a solid comeback at some point, with or without Iron Man. There’s another actor who’s more than due for a comeback, and for whom the role of Iron Man would’ve been perfect. You’ll never guess who I’m thinking of…

iron mang

Why Not Wopat?

RDJ’s take on Tony Stark/Iron Man is an equal mix of charm, attitude, and smarts. Another character that matches that description? Tom Wopat’s Luke Duke. Imagine if, instead of souping up a ’69 Dodge Charger, Luke put his mechanical know-how to work building a high-powered, weaponized suit of armor—pretty much a perfect fit, no? Give essentially the same rambunctious rapscallion a few billion dollars, knowledge of advanced military technology, and some state-of-the-art precision machining equipment, and you’ve got Tony Stark.

Tom Wopat’s definitely got the chops to carry the role. What about the look? In the comics, Tony Stark has always looked more or less like RDJ did in his portrayal: dark hair, goatee, etc. Wopat’s got hair for days, but he might look a little funny with the hipster-magician facial hair Downey sports in Iron Man. Surely the hair and makeup department could’ve found a style that would fit Wopat’s handsome mug.

One big difference between RDJ and Tom Wopat is their age: when Iron Man was released, Downey was 43; Wopat was 56. RDJ is already a little on the “old” side to be portraying a superhero, even one that doesn’t actually rely on physical superpowers (as all of Iron Man’s abilities come from his super suit). However, I think Wopat’s additional years would’ve actually made more sense for the character. Follow me here:

In the comics, Tony Stark is the CEO of Stark Industries, one of the biggest weapons manufacturers in the world and a multi-billion dollar corporation. Though he essentially inherited the position from his father, Howard Stark, the founder of the company, how many major, multi-billion dollar CEOs are in their 40s when they reach that echelon? I’d guess not many. Iron Man’s director, Jon Favreau, has stated that he was going for a more realistic feel for the film (as realistic as one can be when chronicling the exploits of a dude in a walking tank), so an older, though still as cocky and confident, Tony Stark would be more believable.

Another plus for Wopat: he’s several inches taller than RDJ. In superhero movies, bigger is always better, especially when it comes to the hero himself. A minor quibble, but a taller Iron Man is a bigger Iron Man is a better Iron Man, no doubt.

Photo credit: Chris Blakeley via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

Action and/or Adventure, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Tom Wopat in: Terminator 2

as: Miles Dyson

Let us preface this by saying that we strongly dislike the Terminator movies. We don’t object to the violence or the salty language; no, we object to the fact that the basic premise of the series is stupid.

If Skynet and their robotic minions are so smart, why did they make their cyborgs—which are initially intended to infiltrate the human resistance and wipe it out from the inside—all look alike, and more than that, make them all look like an easily recognizable person? “Hey,” a human resistance fighter says as another perfectly-muscled stranger strides up to their camp, “isn’t that the same meathead who tried to blow us up last week?” If, for whatever reason, the Terminators did all have to look the same, wouldn’t it have worked better if they looked like average dudes?

Also: if your cyborgs are meant to blend in with your enemy, and the majority of the fighting apparently takes place in (the ruins of) America, why give them thick Austrian accents?

With that in mind, we dreamed up a scenario in which Tom Wopat, stepping into Joe Morton’s role, makes one small choice that ultimately ends the series at its logical conclusion (the end of the second movie).

Squint and it looks just like Tommy Dubya.

Squint and it looks just like Tommy Dubya.

Key Changes

Rather than changes based on the actor playing the role, the Wopatized Terminator 2 would change the path the character takes. This change could easily have been made with Morton still in the role, but if we’re going to have an actor save us from three—and counting?—lousy sequels and a short-lived, easily-forgotten TV series, it might as well be Tom Wopat, right? Right.

The Wopatized film progresses exactly as the original version up until Arnold Schwarzenegger leads John Connor, Sarah Connor, and Wopat’s Miles Dyson to Cyberdyne Systems’ headquarters. There, instead of destroying the remaining components of the destroyed Terminator from the first film, he simply alters all the blueprints and data that Cyberdyne has thus far developed toward the creation of new cyborgs.

He doesn’t even need to make significant changes. By simply altering the designs so that each component is a tenth of an inch off from its original dimensions, it would completely screw everything up. Parts for the prototype Terminators would come back from the short run stampers and nothing would fit right.

Instead of blowing himself up in a gigantic fireball that takes half the building with him, Wopat/Dyson could just keep fudging the information every month or so. Just like five or six different parts (out of probably thousands) every time—not enough so it’s easily noticeable sabotage, but enough to keep the machine from being assembled correctly. Eventually, the Cyberdyne bigwigs would tire of wasting money on a project that is going nowhere, and would cancel the whole thing.

Granted, this tactic wouldn’t help defeat the evil, shapeshifting T-1000, but hey, that’s what Arnie’s there for.

Photo credit: Thomas Hawk via Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Action and/or Adventure, Original Wopatizations, Science Fiction and/or Fantasy

Water-Man: An Original Wopatization

Superhero/comic book movies are all the rage these days, even if their source materials are becoming increasingly obscure—there’s going to be an Inhumans movie, for crying out loud. Since these flicks are more popular than ever, regardless of the familiarity of their characters, we thought we’d concoct our own superhero tale for the one and only Tom Wopat.

Though he’s not the “typical” actor you see playing a superhero, we think Tom Wopat is an ideal choice. First of all, he’s got enough name recognition that moviegoers would think, “Tom Wopat as a superhero? That seems odd,” which would build intrigue (much like Heath Ledger’s casting as the Joker in The Dark Knight). Intrigue sells tickets.

Second, why do superheroes always have to be young dudes? Putting an older actor such as Mr. Wopat in the starring role would: A) make it feel slightly more grounded in reality (what are the odds that the only people who ever get superpowers are those under 30?); and B) bring in the older audience that most superhero flicks are missing out on. Young folks come for an action-packed superhero tale, older folks come for the relatable man of a certain age doing the heroing. It’d be like printing money!

He is Water. He is Man. He is… Water-Man!

Water-Man

Brock Benjamin (played by Tom Wopat) is an ordinary guy in NYC. He makes a living installing industrial equipment at locations all over the city. One day, he’s installing a commercial water softener at an experimental research facility when an explosion (caused by the film’s villain, the Blue Buzzard) knocks him into the softener’s deep reservoir tank.

Before he can swim to the surface and climb out of the tank, an experiment at the facility, designed to simulate lightning, goes haywire and unleashes a massive blast of gamma radiation. The building is leveled, but the tank Wopat’s character was in is miraculously spared destruction.

Benjamin/Wopat stumbles out of the rubble. Fire blazes all around him. Having been momentarily blinded by the explosions, and knocked a little loopy by bonking his head on the side of the tank, he staggers into a flaming pile of wreckage. Rather than being burned, Wopat finds that he has extinguished the flames just by touching them.

He singlehandedly puts out the entire, huge fire at the research facility, dousing the last burning embers just as the fire department arrives, sirens blaring. “How the heck did you do that?” ask the grizzled fire chief.

“I… I don’t know,” Benjamin/Wopat says. He turns to walk away, morphing into a walking puddle that pours through a sewer grate and disappears.

Later, back at his shabby flat in the Bronx, Wopat tests his newfound abilities. The gamma radiation has fused the molecules of his body with those of the water in the tank. He is now capable of turning into water at will, of shooting almost endless volumes of water from his hands, and of manipulating other bodies of water telekinetically. (This last one also applies to other fluids that are mostly water, including Miller Lite—product placement ahoy!—which leads to a humorous scene at a pub where he shows his old buddy, John [played by John Schneider, naturally], his new powers.)

From there, the flick follows the usual superhero movie formula: a burgeoning love interest who will later be imperiled by her connection to Water-Man, an over-the-top villain (the aforementioned Blue Buzzard) with some sort of world-conquering scheme, a huge CGI battle that causes several hundred million dollars’ worth of damage, etc. We’re still ironing out the details, obviously.

Photo credit: Panegyrics of Granovetter via Foter.com / CC BY-SA